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Saturday, December 1, 2007

Good news for film

As most know, the longer Kodak makes movie film, the longer it will make photo film. Good news for all! Here is the latest from Rochester's newspaper. You can get the business angle here.
(November 30, 2007) — Eastman Kodak Co. on Thursday unveiled a new generation of motion-picture film produced in Rochester that will expand the spectrum of light available to cinematographers.

Vision3, which is an upgrade of Vision2 film, uses an advanced dye layering technique to help the silver halide crystals capture more light. That means the crystals can be smaller, which makes the image less grainy, according to a description of the film on the company's Web site.

David Long, a former Kodak employee who helped create the film, said Vision3 is the equivalent of adding new colors to an artist's palette."Cinematographers are artists who paint with light and this allows them to work with deeper, richer shadows and lighter highlights," said Long, who is now chairman of the Rochester Institute of Technology digital cinema program. ...

4 comments:

loveOliver said...

It recently came to light, Austin's main processing lab no longer processes film. Soon, the other lab with dip and dunk processors will inevitably also discontinue the chemical process. I hope I won't be mailing my film for processing soon. Thanks to the cinema industry, film will be available for at least the near future.

LKB said...

Good to hear from you loveOliver. Since I've been in Boston, 5 stores/labs have closed or downsized. Let's keep shooting!

Suzanne said...

As a committed shooter of film, I'm encouraged by this. I don't shoot movies, but I found some comfort when I learned recently that one can still buy Super 8 movie film for movie cameras that have not been manufactured since about 1984.

It's a little discouraging that so many labs have closed or downsized, but I'm doing my best to keep Kodak afloat. Hope they don't abandon us too soon, but it seems they are still researching and developing film products.

Can you imagine a world with no tri-x?

David said...

I wish they made more movies using Tri-X